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AIRCREW/COCKPIT COMPATIBILITY: 
A MULTIVARIATE PROBLEM SEEKING A MULTIVARIATE SOLUTION

Keith C. Hendy
Defence and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine
North York, Ontario, Canada M3M 3B9

AGARD Conference Proceedings No. 491, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, 1990.


NOTE: The following are selected extracts from and/or annotations regarding the subject publication. 

"Aircrew/cockpit compatibility depends on an interaction between the anthropometry of individual aircrew members and the geometry of the cockpit. Selection criteria in the past have attempted to deal with this interaction, but the model was too simple. This is a multi-variate problem which requires a multi-variate solution. Essentially the problem is one of charting the region of intersection between the anthropometric data domain and a set of rules or criteria which define 'operability'. The nature of this problem was demonstrated through computer simulated fitting trials of subjects in a number of cockpit-like geometries. The simulations clearly demonstrate that membership in a particular category of 'fit' depends on interactions between workspace and anthropometry which are geometry specific. Further, the simulations show that the establishment of analytical expressions to define class membership is complex and appears to require a non-linear approach. The consequences of these results are discussed in terms of establishing selection standards and determining design criteria for cockpits which are compatible with these standards. It is argued that cockpit design must be based on an extensive sampling of human characteristics in order that the full range of interactions, between various anthropometric dimensions and the workspace, is represented. 

" ... This paper examines the effects of interactions between individual anthropometry and workspace geometry with a view to establishing the consequences of these interactions in developing selection strategies and guidelines for design. The problem of defining physical compatibility in the workspace, is essentially one of charting the region of intersection between an anthropometric data space and a set of rules or criteria which define 'operability' in a workspace. The non-linear multi-variate nature of this problem is demonstrated through computer simulation fitting trials of subjects in a number of cockpit-like geometries. The computations make use of a simple sagittal plane manikin to represent the human skeletal form."

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